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Dev Software

#1
I'm considering wiping my PC yet again and I can usually get down my 'essential' software within a few minutes. After that, I focus on getting all my dev shit down and sorted nicely.

So what are your usual editors/toolchains/IDEs that you install whenever building back up?

Windows:
Text Editor:
  • VS Code
  • EmEditor
IDE(s):
  • CLion (C/C++)
  • GoLand (Go)
  • IntelliJ (Java)
  • Visual Studio (.Net, some C/C++ related stuff too.)
  • Arduino (Arduino)
  • Keil uVision (microvision) (Embedded applications in C, MDK)
  • Gnat/GPS (Ada)
Other:
  • STM32cubeMX (Code generator for STM32 boards)
  • Fritzing (Schematics)
  • Choco/NuGet (Package Managers)
  • Git
Toolchains:
  • Node
  • MinGW (C/C++)
  • Non-VB/C# VisualStudio packages (F#, linux, etc.)

Linux:
Text Editors:
  • VS Code
  • nvim
  • Atom (ONLY if VS Code isn't supported on the target without overlays, AKA Gentoo)
IDEs:
  • Arduino
  • mBed (not installed, just what I use.)
Other:
  • Git
Toolchains:
  • Node
  • GCC family
Most of my Linux development is in C so I don't need to go overboard with the IDEs (not that there are many good ones available for Linux.)
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#2
I'm not a developer but...

I typically use Gedit/Notepad ++.

a bit of GCC for compiling c++/C.

a sega genesis C/Assembly compiler (hard to find, runs in wine).

and of course the various python Libraries and such since I primarily code in python for interface stuff.

the one down side to my form of tinkering/programming is that most of the console libraries are written for windows so I have to find ways around it.

luckily atari 2600 software was mostly written in ASM XD
"I reject your reality and subsitute my own." - Adam Savage, Mythbusters
[Image: 5.jpg]
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#3
Nice guide.

Lately I've been using Visual Studio Code almost exclusively for most projects. I like it because it's very lightweight compared to more advanced IDEs (eclipse, I'm looking at you), but it has the tools that are needed to get the job done. It's actually pretty advanced in terms of actual code-related features, such as detecting PHP errors before you try to upload the files to the server. xCode doesn't do this out of the box, so it's nice that VS Code spent a lot of time on features that were useful, and not just interface related things.

If I'm on Linux, I use Geany (similar to notepad++, but it looks nicer). If I'm developing Python, I usually just use Idle (a terrible IDE but it gets the job done and requires less configuration than other options). That said, I use pyCharm for projects that are longer than a couple hundred lines in Python.

And then everyone uses vim on Linux command line and swears by it. I've always used Nano instead, and I think they are both more or less equally good. They have completely different methods for getting things done, so I think it's just a matter of what you're used to.

Simpler is better in my opinion. Give me a text editor that has tabs and good syntax highlighting, and I'm happy.
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#4
You Know it's funny, that's why I use notepad++ for website editing, it's got tabs, it's easy to use, it automatically goes into a mode that color codes the various operands and you can even click on a close tag and it takes you to it's corresponding starting tag, great for debugging if you're trying to correct an error somewhere.

Honestly it and bugzilla are my two biggest tools when editing css/html.

One more cool thing it does, it lets you view the folder structure of the site you're editing locally since html is case sensitive and stuff, this is great for easily linking stuff without having to hop around.

Then when I'm editing my blog I just upload the folders and files with the changes to the live site.
"I reject your reality and subsitute my own." - Adam Savage, Mythbusters
[Image: 5.jpg]
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#5
(April 10th, 2020 at 1:18 PM)SpookyZalost Wrote: You Know it's funny, that's why I use notepad++ for website editing, it's got tabs, it's easy to use, it automatically goes into a mode that color codes the various operands and you can even click on a close tag and it takes you to it's corresponding starting tag, great for debugging if you're trying to correct an error somewhere.

It's the primary thing I use for my modding efforts. The tabs, and being able to change things across all those tabs simultaneously is a huge time-saver.
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#6
XCode and VS Code, and Docker.

XCode because I code a lot of Swift; VS code because my company site and personal site are both on Github Pages. Docker because sometimes it’s nice to have local environments.
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